Canada Water

Today’s photowalk is a short one, as I make an attempt to explore the area around Canada Water, but fail to find anything interesting.

But let’s start from the beginning, when I arrive at the Canada Water station. It’s a rather grey and dull day, and I am surprised to realise that as much as I love the sunlit London under a blue sky, it actually does look more harmonious and authentic in lighting like today.

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Here is the actual Canada Water, and the reason why I know this place is that it has this huge sports clothes and equipment store, Decathlon, where I buy my sportswear from time to time. I’ll be heading there today as well!

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It’s quite fascinating how the plumbeous sky makes the water look silvery.

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Apparently, the whole area used to be a dock, most of which was filled in in the 1980s, and the Canada Water lake is all that’s left. I actually thought that the reeds grew naturally here, but it seems like they were artificially planted at about the same time.

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That interestingly shaped building on the right is the Canada Water Library.

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Time to do some shopping now! All I need is a few sports bras and tops, but let me just show you around the store a bit. As you can see, it is ginormous and it really has all sorts of sports equipment.

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Even tents for camping and inflatable mattresses can be found here.

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The store has an immense selection of sportswear, which is also sorted by purpose: running, fitness, cycling, hiking, etc.

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The gym equipment is openly displayed and anyone can try it out.

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I am now in the women’s fitness wear section, filling my shopping basket with stuff that I need and don’t need.

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Once done with shopping, I decide to walk beyond that familiar area around the lake and see what is out there. Google Maps tell me that there is a dock nearby, and I am heading towards it.

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Here it is, the Greenland Dock. I discover a rather surprising fact that the whole place consists of Scandinavian- and Baltic-themed odonyms: there is a Finland Street, an Onega Gate, a Norway Gate, a Helsinki Square, a Swedish Quay, a Greenland Quay. After a bit of research I find out that the dock used to specialise in particularly the Baltic side of British timber trade.

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Unlike Clapham Common in one of my previous posts, there are no ambiguous fishing-related signs: it is forbidden altogether.

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The high-rises of Canary Wharf are visible from behind the dock and the Thames.

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Overall, one essential part of a nice urban landscape for me is water – whether it’s a sea, or a river, or a lake, or a pond, or a dock, you name it!

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Suddenly I spot this nice piece of street art under the bridge – completely by accident.

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Then I turn to Lower Road to walk back to the Canada Water station. As I mentioned, there is nothing interesting to see, so I’m a bit disappointed.

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Most houses don’t even have the usual greenery and flowers before them, so I’m quite happy when I find a few that do.

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One advantage of uninteresting places, though, is that you can focus on smaller details like individual doors, archways etc., rather than the bigger picture.

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